Forget about Setting New Year’s Intentions

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Forget about Setting New Year’s Intentions

 

By: Bren Boston, MD

Talk about setting yourself up for failure. Trying to make a decision about a behavioral change that you will stick with for 12 straight months is nonsense. What research shows is that it takes 3 weeks to form a new habit. So, this year, I encourage you to make separate monthly intentions starting with January 2019. Try it on, feel it out, see if it works for you or if it is even possible to ...

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Men: Are You Controlling Your Stress, or Is It Controlling You?

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Men: Are You Controlling Your Stress, or Is It Controlling You?

 

By Edison de Mello, M.D., Ph.D.
Co-authored by David Laramie, Ph.D.

You know that stress is supposed to be bad, but do you know what to do about it? To make this even more complicated, did you know that all stress is not bad and that it can even be helpful? A number of recent news stories have seemingly turned the conventional narrative on its head and suggested that we should ...

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Holiday Stress? Recognize and Rebalance!

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Holiday Stress? Recognize and Rebalance!

 

By Alicia Maher, MD

Along with the joys of the holidays, there may be quite a bit of stress. Though it may not seem like it, this could be an exciting opportunity for growth. Taking a few moments during this season to learn to relax from the higher level of stress will make it that much easier to relax when the holidays have passed and we’re back to normal everyday tension.

Most of the stressors that we experience throughout the day ...

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Is Sleep Deprivation the Next Tobacco?

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Is Sleep Deprivation the Next Tobacco?

 

By. David Laramie, PhD

For decades, medical science overlooked the considerable damage associated with smoking cigarettes, and it is hard to comprehend that physicians ever condoned smoking and overlooked its harm. Similarly, medical science is now rushing to highlight another long-overlooked risk factor – sleep deprivation. Poor sleep can worsen inflammation and increases the risk of high blood pressure, obesity, depression, and some cancers. In the short term, insufficient sleep can impair memory, attention, and executive function. There is even ...

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Courage is Good For Your Health

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Courage is Good For Your Health

 

Dr. Bren Boston

Courage makes us feel good. It allows us to have some control over how we react to our fears. Courage gives us the bravery to stand up to our fears, again and again, whether we conquer those fears or not. Perhaps then, we should appreciate that courage can also have a beneficial effect on our mental and physical health. Staying healthy can allow us to be more courageous.

Courage is one of those intangible powers inside all of ...

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3 Ways to Practice Patience

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3 Ways to Practice Patience

As our world becomes faster our attention span decreases and so does our ability to practice patience. And yes, it requires a great deal of practice.

Why is this important?

I came across this great article posted by the Huffington post on the reasons why one should practice patience as well as some great tips to help you get there:

As virtues go, patience is a quiet one.

It’s often exhibited behind closed doors, not on a public stage: A father ...

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3 Ways to De-Stress This Holiday Season

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3 Ways to De-Stress This Holiday Season

 

The holiday season is upon us and, chances are, you are more stressed than usual. Be it difficult family dynamics, arduous travel plans, or simply changing your iron clad routine, the holiday season has a unique way in winding us up.

Alicia R. Maher MD, board certified diplomate of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, states that scientifically, when we disrupt our normal lives, we rely more on the “reactive” parts of the brain, and it’s a very overwhelming state ...

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The Psychological Cost of Academic Success

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The Psychological Cost of Academic Success

Work hard and go to school. For some, this motto is taken to heart, so much so that they fulfill the highest academic degree available, a doctorate degree.

Earning a PhD is hard work and includes the expected stress associated with a demanding workload, but studies are showing that the stress, lack of sleep, and high expectations are leading to concerning levels mental health challenges.

In a recent article titled “There’s an awful cost to getting a PhD that no ...

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Burnout Remedies

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Burnout Remedies

By David Laramie, PhD

If the recent traffic on the 10 is any indication, its seems that a whole lot of Angelenos are headed to work these days.  The sweet days of the summer slow down have receded and its back to the usual grind.  Therefore, it’s a good idea to pause and reflect on ways to approach the demands of work in deliberate and health promoting ways.  Without a gameplan, it is all too easy to lapse into the ...

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Why Working More Can Hurt Your Bottom Line

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Why Working More Can Hurt Your Bottom Line

In a culture focused on ‘more is better’ it is no surprise that many of us are overworked. This may be due to a demanding boss, our competitive nature, or the increased availability to tap into work at any given moment. Regardless of cause, it is clear that chronic overwork does not lead to more productivity, rather, it has a negative impact on health and the bottom line:

There’s a large body of research that suggests that regardless of our reasons for ...

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